Auntie B’s Pantry

Home

Products

Contact

Welcome!

If you purchased or have been gifted a dried Sally starter packet, you’re in the right place!


On this page you’ll find a complete step-by-step guide on getting your starter rehydrated plus how to use and care for your starter after that.

red heart icon
red heart icon
red heart icon
red heart icon

Sally Starter Guide

Rehydrating your dried Sally starter

What you’ll need:

  • 10g Dried Sally Starter
  • 1 Glass Jar
  • 1 Stirring Utensil
  • 1 Cover for Jar
  • 1 Rubber band
  • Organic white flour - I use King Arthur brand for starter maintenance

Recommended:

  • Kitchen Scale - for better accuracy and recipe success!

Step-by-step: (Kitchen Scale Method)

Prep:

Clean jar and stirring stick with warm soapy water. Rinse well and let air dry.

Combine sourdough starter + 10 grams water in the clean jar. Stir well and let sit, covered, for one hour to hydrate. After an hour, add 10 grams "Sally food" (organic white flour) to the jar. Stir until well combined. Cover jar with the cloth lid and secure with the metal band. Let sit in a warm location for 24 hours.

Day 1:

Add 30 grams water + 30 grams "Sally food" to your jar. Stir well and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 2:

Measure out 30 grams and “discard” the rest - you can keep the discarded starter in a jar in the fridge. Now add 30 grams water + 30 grams "Sally food." Stir well and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 3:

Repeat steps from Day 3. You should be seeing more bubbles in your starter. Wrap the provided rubber band around the jar to measure any rise activity.

Day 4:

Repeat steps from Day 3. At this point your starter should double in size within 8-12 hours. Once it has done this, your starter is ready to be used in a recipe. Continue the feeding and discarding cycle daily or store in your refrigerator and feed once per week.

Day 5:

Black Downwards Arrow

No kitchen scale? No problem.

Step-by-step: (Imperial Measurements)

Prep:

Clean jar and stirring stick with warm soapy water. Rinse well and let air dry.

Combine sourdough starter + 2 teaspoons water in the clean jar. Stir well and let sit, covered, for one hour to hydrate. After an hour, add 3 teaspoons "Sally food" (organic white flour) to the jar. Stir until well combined. Cover jar with the cloth lid and secure with the metal band. Let sit in a warm location for 24 hours.

Day 1:

Add 3 tablespoons water + 1/4 cup "Sally food" to your jar.* Stir well and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 2:

Pour out roughly half of the mixture and “discard” - you can keep the discarded starter in a jar in the fridge. Now add 3 tablespoons water + 1/4 cup "Sally food." Stir well and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 3:

Repeat steps from Day 3. You should be seeing more bubbles in your starter. Wrap the provided rubber band around the jar to measure any rise activity.

Day 4:

Repeat steps from Day 3. At this point your starter should double in size within 8-12 hours. Once it has done this, your starter is ready to be used in a recipe. Continue the feeding and discarding cycle daily or store in your refrigerator and feed once per week.

Day 5:

*The consistency should be similar to creamy peanut butter. If your mixture is very dry and doesn’t stir easily, add a bit more water.

Tips for Success

Using a kitchen scale is highly recommended. Is this mandatory? No. But it will make your life so much easier and will ensure more accurate and consistent results.

Temperature matters, find a cozy place for your starter. The ideal temperature for sourdough starters is between 75F-85F. This temperature will ensure the best rising results. Be sure to keep your starter away from direct heat sources and out of direct sunlight.

Filtered water is best. Sourdough microbes are delicate and chlorine in tap water can cause problems. Using filtered or non-chlorinated water is best. Don't have any? Let tap water sit out on your counter uncovered overnight. The chlorine will evaporate and your water will be ready to go.

Sourdough “discard” shouldn’t be thrown away. There are so many wonderful recipes to be made with the discarded portion of sourdough. Follow us for recipes and ideas on how to use it!

Questions? Ask Bianca at hello@auntiebspantry.com

For more sourdough recipes, tips, and guidance be sure to follow us!

Instagram icon outlined
字母f图标

Maintenance

Maintaining a daily feeding schedule will ensure your starter stays happy and healthy. Feeding once every 24 hours (AM or PM) is usually a good way to go. Some recipes recommend feeding twice in 24 hours for a stronger starter.

Sourdough starter

1:1:1 Method: Kitchen Scale Recommended

Keep your starter at room temperature and feed once daily with equal parts by weight of starter, flour, and water. Discard all but the starting amount of starter each day.


Example:

30g starter + 30g flour + 30g water = 90g total


Discard 60g to bring it back to 30g starter, and repeat each day.

Tip: Once your starter is active and consistently doubling in size after each feeding, you’ll want to start recording the time it takes to do this. Once you know how long it takes for your starter to double in size, you’ll be able to plan for future recipes.

No scale? No problem.

If you don’t have a scale or don’t need exact measurements for a recipe, feel free to use this more relaxed method.


Simply mix 1/4 - 1/2 cup starter and flour plus enough water to make a thick but stirrable mixture. It should be the consistency of peanut butter. Add more or less water and flour to get it just right.


Discard roughly half (or more) of the starter each day. Repeat the process daily if you would like to have an active starter on hand all the time.

Do you need to take a break or “pause” your starter?

If so, go HERE.

Recipe Prep

Sourdough miche bread

Once your starter is consistently doubling in size after each feeding, it’s ready to start baking!

Preparing to use your starter:

You’ll want to make sure the total amount of starter you have will be enough for the recipe plus a little extra to set aside. The point is to always keep a little bit of your starter so you can continue feeding it and making more bread.

Recipe measurement example:

If you need 100g active starter for your recipe, you could start with 40g starter and feed 40g flour + 40g water to get 120g total. Use the 100g in your recipe and save 20g.

Pausing Starter

refrigerator

Pausing your starter:

If you aren’t baking bread daily, keeping your starter refrigerated will slow down the feeding schedule to once every 1-2 weeks.


How to store:


Feed your starter the normal 1:1:1 ratio. Cover your container with a lid and place near the back of your fridge.


Once every 1-2 weeks take your starter out, discard part of the starter and feed per usual. If you’re ready to bake, feed your starter and leave out at room temperature overnight. It should be bubbly and active by the next day.

The information provided on this website is intended for general information purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always consult with a qualified healthcare professional for personalized medical advice.

Copyright Outline Icon

2024 Nourish and Thrive, LLC. All rights reserved.